repeat after me (kaleidoscope)

No, Pong is not the next Snap project—a kaleidoscope is.  Here is the example of the kind of thing they mean by a kaleidoscope.

Four sprites moving in synchrony.  This example was presented as you see it—in .gif format.  No clues on how to make one like it except some platitudes. “You will need four sprites.” Well no shaving cream, Sherlock! “The easiest way to create three more is to duplicate the one you have.” You mean there are other ways?  The only way I could figure out to make more sprites without cracking the manual (there is one) is by right-clicking the existing sprite and clicking duplicate.  That also duplicates the code.  So I did break down and look at the manual.

It turns out that green flag is at the top of the stage.  Quick peeky-see at the names of all the areas on the Snap screen—from the actual homework that I actually did that had the actual kaleidoscope program assigned. Here’s that picture.

See the flag?  When you click that, it counts for all the sprites that have that block of code so you can start …. say, four sprites, and have them do synchronous stuff. This is what I came up with.  It is similar, but different, you can look at the code by exiting full-screen mode.  I think that it’s more of the sort of thing I think of as kaleidoscopic.  I think the color should be the same for all sprites but change over time.

Now, I’m ready for Pong.  Well, no, that’s not right, now the next major project i turn in is Pong.  I’ll probably do some other things in the meanwhile.  Pong has a rubric. For those who don’t know, a rubric is a scoring chart that lists aspects of my program and how many points each is worth.  Everything from “Players can control paddles with required keys” to “Program is well-documented and exhibits good style.” Whoa, documented? I don’t think I saw comment blocks in Snap (not that I was looking, mind you).  I’m usually adequate at commenting. I hope that’s good enough for my grader. I guess I’ll find out.

Wish me luck!